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When and where did crime fiction begin?
Some students of the genre, eager to provide it with a respectably lengthy pedigree, have traced its sources back to stories in biblical and Ancient Greek literature but this is special pleading. More convincingly, the critic and crime writer Julian Symons cited William Godwin’s 1794 novel Caleb Williams as the first true crime novel. Certainly Caleb Williams hinges on the investigation of a murder but Godwin is more interested in using his narrative to expose the injustices of contemporary society than he is in unfolding a suspenseful crime novel. It is difficult to read the book today and accept unreservedly that here is a work of crime fiction. A better case can be made that the genre really began in the middle decades of the nineteenth century and that it began in America, England and France.

AN ENGLISH, A FRENCHMAN AND AN AMERICAN...
In America in the 1840s, Edgar Allan Poe became the founding father of detective fiction with the three short stories in which the brilliantly ratiocinative Auguste Dupin solves apparently insoluble mysteries. ‘The Murders in the Rue Morgue’, first published in a magazine in 1841, is the prototype ‘locked room mystery’ in which Dupin is faced by a series of murders where the killings take place in apparently inaccessible rooms and has to work out how they were committed. It was followed by ‘The Mystery of Marie Roget’, in which Poe takes a notorious real-life murder in New York and re-imagines it in Dupin’s Paris, and ‘The Purloined Letter’, the story of a compromising letter being used for blackmail, which Dupin finds after all police attempts to locate it have failed.

In England in the 1860s, a new genre of fiction emerged which became known as ‘sensation fiction’. With its antecedents in the Gothic and ‘Newgate’ novels of earlier decades, ‘sensation fiction’ peered beneath the surface gentility of Victorian domesticity and revealed a world of bigamy, madness, murder and violence supposedly lurking there. It was all too much for some critics. One described the genre as ‘unspeakably disgusting’ and castigated its ‘ravenous appetite for carrion’. The best-known purveyor of ‘sensation fiction’ was Wilkie Collins. Collins’s most famous books are The Woman in White (1860) and The Moonstone (1868), novels which hinge on the working out of a crime mystery. In The Moonstone Wilkie Collins introduces the idiosyncratic and intelligent Sergeant Cuff who, although he mistakenly suspects an innocent person and is eventually dismissed from the case, is the first of innumerable police protagonists in crime fiction over the next 140 years.

Collins may have been influenced by the short-lived French novelist Emile Gaboriau (1833–73) who wrote a number of books which use themes and motifs still recognisable in crime fiction today. A great admirer of Poe, Gaboriau is best remembered for the creation of Monsieur Lecoq, an agent of the French Sûreté and a rational, scientifically minded detective able to astonish his colleagues by his careful analysis of clues at the scene of the crime and his leaps of deduction. Lecoq first appeared as a supporting character in an 1866 novel entitled The Lerouge Affair but he took centre stage in The Mystery of Orcival (1867) and several subsequent novels.

Together, the American Poe, the Englishman Collins and the Frenchman Gaboriau created templates in crime fiction which have lasted to the present day.

THE INCOMPARABLE HOLMES
The next leap forward came, some twenty years after the publication of The Moonstone and more than a decade after the death of Gaboriau, with Arthur Conan Doyle’s creation of Sherlock Holmes. Holmes is not an entire original (Doyle borrowed elements from both Poe’s Dupin and Gaboriau’s Lecoq) but the supremely rational private investigator, able to make the most startlingly accurate deductions on the basis of the flimsiest of evidence, rapidly became the most famous of all fictional detectives, a position he has held ever since and is unlikely to relinquish as long as crme fiction is read.

Holmes and his stolid comrade Dr Watson have transcended the boundaries of the fiction in which they appeared in a way that few characters in English literature, other than some of Shakespeare’s and some of Dickens’s, have done. They have entered an almost mythical realm. The two men first appeared in A Study in Scarlet, published in Beeton’s Christmas Annual of 1887. Doyle received the princely sum of £25 for the rights to the novella. The Sign of Four followed in 1890 but it was only when The Strand magazine began publishing Holmes short stories in 1891 that the character’s enormous public popularity really began. The magazine’s circulation rose dramatically as the stories were published. Eventually Doyle, wearying of his character and keen that his historical fiction should not be overshadowed by the detective, attempted to kill Holmes off, sending him hurtling over the Reichenbach Falls in the arms of his mortal enemy Professor Moriarty. But the public was having none of it. They wanted more of the great detective and Doyle had finally to acquiesce to public demand and resurrect Holmes. He continued to publish Holmes stories in The Strand until 1927. By this time, the Golden Age of English crime fiction was set to dawn.

CRIME’S GOLDEN YEARS
The years between the first and last appearances of Sherlock Holmes in The Strand were fruitful ones for crime fiction. Holmes had plenty of imitators, from Arthur Morrison’s Martin Hewitt (whose adventures also appeared in The Strand in the 1890s) to Jacques Futrelle’s character, Professor Van Dusen, the ‘Thinking Machine’ who featured in a series of short stories and two novels published in the first decade of the 20th century. Many other writers enjoyed success with crime fiction. Some, like G.K. Chesterton, who created the meek but masterly priest Father Brown in 1911, wrote their detective stories in the time they could spare from other writing. Others, like Chesterton’s close friend E.C. Bentley, produced a single, striking example of the genre (Bentley published Trent’s Last Case in 1913). Yet others built long careers on crime fiction. R. Austin Freeman wrote The Red Thumb Mark, his first book about the forensic investigator and lawyer Dr Thorndyke, in 1907 and went on to publish more than 30 other novels involving the same character. Edgar Wallace’s prodigious output of crime fiction (he often published half a dozen books a year) began with The Four Just Men in 1905 and continued until his death in Hollywood in 1932 (where he was working on the script of King Kong).

It was women writers, however, who led the way in creating English crime fiction’s Golden Age. Agatha Christie published her first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, in 1920 and it introduced the character of Hercule Poirot, who was soon to become the second most famous fictional detective in the world. Other women writers followed in Christie’s footsteps. Dorothy L. Sayers’s first Lord Peter Wimsey book appeared in 1923, Margery Allingham created the character of Albert Campion in her 1929 novel The Crime at Black Dudley and Ngaio Marsh produced her first novel in 1934. By this time the rules and conventions of the classic whodunit were firmly in place. Indeed, a Detection Club for crime novelists was founded in 1928. Early members included Sayers, Christie, Chesterton and Ronald Knox and they agreed, half in jest and half in earnest, to adhere to a set of rules in their novels that would allow readers a fair chance of working out the guilty party. ‘Do you promise’, said one of the clauses in the club’s membership ceremony, ‘that your detectives shall well and truly detect the crimes presented to them, using those wits which it may please you to bestow upon them and not placing reliance upon nor making use of Divine Revelation, Feminine Intuition, Mumbo Jumbo, Jiggery Pokery, Coincidence, or any hitherto unknown Act of God?’

The rules were often breached but there was a genuine sense that the genre had conventions that needed to be observed. Tried and tested settings (the English country house, for example) appeared in dozens and dozens of novels in the 1930s. So too did stock characters – in some books it really was the butler who did it. At its worst, the supposed Golden Age produced a lot of tired, stale and cliché-ridden fiction. At its best – in the works of Christie, Sayers, Allingham, Marsh and others – it created sophisticated and witty narratives that have lost none of their entertainment value as the decades have passed.

FROM THE DRAWING ROOM TO THE MEAN STREETS
Across the Atlantic, there were writers who were happy to produce their own American versions of the mannered and often eccentric mysteries that were so popular in Britain. Beginning with The Benson Murder Case in 1926, S.S. Van Dine wrote a dozen novels featuring the dandified aesthete and man-about-Manhattan Philo Vance. Two cousins, Frederick Dannay and Manfred B. Lee, joined forces to create Ellery Queen, both the pseudonym under which they wrote and the detective who starred in their books.

Side by side with these, however, were the growing numbers of American writers who were creating an indigenous form of crime writing that owed nothing to models from across the Atlantic. Most of them appeared first in the pages of the so-called ‘pulp’ magazines, of which the most famous was Black Mask, founded in 1920 by H.L. Mencken and George Jean Nathan but edited during its most influential years, the late 1920s and early 1930s, by Joseph Shaw. Carroll John Daly’s two characters, Terry Mack and Race Williams, who appeared in Black Mask in 1923, were arguably the first hard-boiled sleuths of all. The star of the magazine, however, was Dashiell Hammett. In a 1927 editorial, Joseph Shaw wrote that, ‘Detective fiction as we see it has only commenced to be developed. All other fields have been worked and overworked, but detective fiction has barely been scratched.’ It was Hammett who proved Shaw right. It was Hammett who, in the words of Raymond Chandler, ‘gave murder back to the people who commit it for reasons, not just to provide a corpse and with means at hand, not with hand-wrought dueling pistols, curare, and tropical fish.’ Chandler himself, probably the most influential of all American crime writers, published his first story in Black Mask in 1933.

In some ways these two main strands of crime fiction – the elaborate puzzles of the classic English detective story and the hard-boiled crime that developed in the pulp magazines – have continued to this day. There have been many crossovers and many novelists who have successfully used elements of both but there is a tradition that links Christie and Marsh with writers like P.D. James and Ruth Rendell just as there is a line that can be drawn from Hammett and Chandler to modern American novelists such as James Ellroy and Elmore Leonard.

PICKING UP THE BATON
In England after the Second World War, the conventions of the Golden Age might have been thought to have become passé but they proved surprisingly resilient. Partly, of course, this was because the leading practitioners were still going strong. Sayers had put aside Lord Peter Wimsey in the late 1930s but Agatha Christie continued to publish fiction into the 1970s. Ngaio Marsh’s last novel was published in 1982, Gladys Mitchell’s in 1984. Partly, it was because new writers arrived to revitalize the traditional form. Edmund Crispin’s first novels, featuring Gervase Fen, one of the great ‘English eccentric’ detectives, appeared in the late 1940s. Michael Innes’s earliest Inspector Appleby novels had been published in the late 1930s but he produced many more in later decades. Michael Gilbert and Julian Symons both began their careers as crime novelists immediately after the war. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, when the greatest practitioners of the Golden Age were coming to the ends of their careers, a third generation of writers emerged. P.D. James created the poet and policeman Adam Dalgleish; Ruth Rendell invented the Sussex town of Kingsmarkham in which Inspector Wexford could display his humane skills as a detective. New Queens of Crime had appeared on the scene.

In America after the war, writers emerged to pick up the baton from Hammett and Chandler. Kenneth Millar, using the pseudonym of Ross Macdonald, created in Lew Archer a detective to rival Chandler’s Philip Marlowe. The first Archer novel, The Moving Target, was published in 1949. In the 1950s, another important subgenre in American crime fiction came to the fore. Earlier novels like Lawrence Treat's V for Victim (1945) and Hilary Waugh's Last Seen Wearing (1952) can be claimed as pioneering police procedurals, but the type of crime fiction which attempts to show realistically the unfolding of a police investigation into a crime or crimes really came into its own with the publication of Ed McBain's 87th Precinct books. Beginning with Cop Hater in 1956, McBain wrote dozens of these novels, set in a fictional city based on New York. The disclaimer that he placed at the beginning of each of them succinctly sums up his aim of blending reality and fiction. 'The city in these pages is imaginary. The people, the places are all fictitious. Only the police routine is based on established investigatory technique.'

Where McBain went in 1950s, dozens of others have followed in the decades since. Indeed, the police procedural has become one of the most popular forms of crime fiction in all media. Not only novels but films and TV series show McBain's influence. It is hard to imagine a pioneering series like Hill Street Blues, for example, and all its imitators without the 87th Precinct.

EXPLORING THE WHYS AND HOWS
There are other strands in crime fiction beyond those of classic English mystery and hard-boiled American realism. There is what is usually termed the psychological thriller which began in the 1930s and can be traced back to the novels Anthony Berkeley Cox wrote under the pseudonym of Frances Iles. Here the emphasis is not on the solution of a puzzle (in Iles's Malice Afterthought there is no doubt who committed the murder) nor on the gritty realism of city life. The interest of the books lies in the slow unravelling of the psyche of the protagonist(s). Many of the finest writers in the genre, from Patricia Highsmith and Margaret Millar to Barbara Vine and Minette Walters, have chosen to work with the psychological thriller.

In another vein, there is the courtroom drama, which contemporary writers such as Scott Turow have made their own. Researchers into the history of the English version of this subgenre could locate prototypes in novels by Dickens and Trollope (or even, if over-diligent, in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice) but the beginnings of the American courtroom drama are best sought in the work of Erle Stanley Gardner. Gardner was one of the writers for Black Mask in the 1920s but his real success came with the creation of the brilliant lawyer Perry Mason. Judged solely by total worldwide sales of books over the years, Mason is the second most popular character in crime fiction (only Sherlock Holmes outranks him) and his influence has been enormous. Beneath all the contemporary glitz and the plots expanded to fill narratives of blockbusting size, the characters in modern courtroom dramas by the likes of Turow and others are basically Perry Mason with attitude.

The forensic thriller has become increasingly popular in the last decade. Variants on the police procedural, where the emphasis is not on the cop on the beat but on the scientist in the laboratory, forensic thrillers found their doyenne in Patricia Cornwell, whose success paved the way for many other fine writers, from Kathy Reichs to Karin Slaughter. With the remarkable popularity of TV series like the CSI franchise, this subgenre has spread from the printed page to other media until it has become one of the most visible of all forms of crime fiction.

Other subgenres can be readily identified (the black farce and comic capers of American writers from Donald E. Westlake to Carl Hiaasen; the historical detective fiction that has proved so popular in both America and the UK) but the significance lies not in the number that can be formally anatomized but in what their variety says about the state of crime fiction today. Since the 1970s, the two major branches of the genre (broadly speaking, English cosy and American hard-boiled) have divided and proliferated to such an extent that the sheer range and quality of writing that gets shelved in bookshops and libraries under the heading of ‘crime fiction’ is remarkable. What other area of fiction in the last thirty years can offer such diverseness? From the tartan noir of Ian Rankin to the Roman scandals of Steven Saylor, from Donna Leon’s
shadow-filled Venice to the mean streets of Walter Mosley’s LA, crime novels range through time and across the world to give readers a variety of experiences that no other style of fiction can match. Today, writers like Daniel Woodrell and Sue Grafton, Michael Dibdin and Tony Hillerman, K.C. Constantine and Minette Walters have very little in common with one another except for the fact that they are all, in very different ways, fine novelists and they are all classified as crime writers.

There are adjoining lands (that of the spy thriller, for instance, or the blockbusting narratives of writers like John Grisham and Tom Clancy) that could have been visited but let us remain within the traditional boundaries of the crime genre.
#Cozy Mysteries #Fantasy&SF&AH&Paranormal Mysteries #Historical Mysteries
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@Rosyjski kryminał @Skandynawski kryminał ► Kryminały - nonfiction
► Kryminologia & kryminalistyka Ace Atkins Adrian McKinty
Alan Hunter Alex Barclay Alex Kava
Alex Palmer Alexander McCall Smith Alexandra Cordes
Alice Sebold Andrew Vachss Ann Granger
Archer Mayor Arthur Upfield Barbara Nadel
Baronowa Orczy Ben Aaronovitch Bernhard Schlink
Betty Webb Bill Pronzini Brian Freeman
C.J. Box Carl Hiaasen Carlos Ruiz Zafon
Carol Goodman Carol Higgins Clark Carol O'Connell
Caroline Graham Carolyn Haines Cecelia Tishy
Charlie Huston Chris Ewan Chris Knopf
Christopher Rice Cody McFadyen Colin Bateman
Colin Dexter Dan Simmons Dave White
David Hewson Debra Purdy Kong Dennis Lehane
Dick Francis Don Winslow Ed McBain (Evan Hunter)
Elizabeth George Elly Griffiths Emily St John Mandel
Erica Spindler Faye Kellerman Frances Fyfield
Fred Vargas G.M. Ford George Pelecanos
Giles Blunt Grant McCrea Henry Perez
Howard Shrier Inger Ash Wolfe J.A. Jance
J.A. Konrath J.T. Ellison Jack Kerley
James Patterson James Swain James W Hall
Jan Seghers Janet Evanovich Jeff Abbott
Jeff Lindsay Jeffrey Deaver Jeffrey Siger
Joe R Lansdale Joel Goldman John Burdett
John Farrow John Hart John Harvey
John Lutz John Sandford Jonathan Kellerman
Karin Slaughter Kate Ellis Kathy Herman
Kathy Reichs Keith Ablow Ken Bruen
Ken McClure Kevin O'Brien Kristine Kathryn Rusch
Laura Lippman Laurie R. King Lee Child
Lee Goldberg Linwood Barclay Lis Wiehl
Lisa Gardner Lisa Miscione Loren D Estleman
Lynda La Plante M.D. Grayson M.J. Rose
Marcia Clark Martha Grimes Martin Limón
Martin Walker Mary Anna Evans Matt Rees
Merry Jones Michael Connelly Michael Dibdin
Michael Harvey Michael Innes Michael Prescott
Michael Robotham Mike Knowles Nelson DeMille
Nev Fountain Nevada Barr Nicci French
Norman Mailer P.D. James Patricia Macdonald
Paul Sussman Peter Abrahams Peter Guttridge
Peter James Peter Robinson Peter Temple
Reed Farrel Coleman Richard Castle Richard Montanari
Richard Price Rick Mofina Robert B. Parker
Robert Crais Robert J Randisi Robert Sims
Ron Goulart Russell Andrews Ruth Dudley Edwards
Sally Spencer Scott Phillips Stephen Leather
Steven James Stuart M Kaminsky Stuart Woods
Susan Hill Tess Gerritsen Timothy Hallinan
Walter Mosley Walter Satterthwait William Bayer
William Bernhardt William Deverell William Kent Krueger
William X Kienzle Yasmina Khadra Zoë Sharp
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Frank Herbert - Soul Catcher (1972)

Soul Catcher (1972) is a novel by the science fiction writer Frank Herbert. Soul Catcher is about a Native American who kidnaps a young white boy and their journey together. It is a story of vengeance and sacrifice. In the conflicted anti-hero, one may see many truths to the feelings harbored by those who were conquered.

Many Native American myths are touched upon; e.g. that the bee does not haphazardly sting its victim, rather it chooses that person. The book is committed to seeing the sacrifice through and the “lamb” must be an innocent to represent the many Native American innocents slaughtered. Therein lies the conflict with our tragic hero, that he may actually have found respect for his young white hostage, yet he knows what it is that he must do for his people.
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  • 27 paź 13 18:44
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Henry Carver - Family Murders (2012)

Angela Gray has the life she used to dream of and the family she's always wanted. When a mysterious man in pink sunglasses starts stalking her daughter, she resolves to do anything to protect her.

But "anything" turns into an investigation that will potentially uncover the truth behind a horrible, decade old crime. Ten years ago, a family was destroyed. Now, everything points to history repeating itself. One fact seems inescapable: her family is next.

Family Murders is a thrilling novella and runs approximately 30,000 words. If you're itching for a dose of something like Lee Child or J. A. Konrath, this is the book for you.
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Jonathan Lethem - Motherless Brooklyn (2000)

Lionel Essrog is Brooklyn’s very own self-appointed Human Freakshow, an orphan whose Tourettic impulses drive him to bark, count, and rip apart our language in startling and original ways. Together with three veterans of the St. Vincent’s Home for Boys, he works for small-time mobster Frank Minna’s limo service cum detective agency. Life without Frank Minna, the charismatic King of Brooklyn, would be unimaginable, so who cares if the tasks he sets them are, well, not exactly legal. But when Frank is fatally stabbed, one of Lionel’s colleagues lands in jail, the other two vie for his position, and the victim’s widow skips town. Lionel’s world is suddenly topsy-turvy, and this outcast who has trouble even conversing attempts to untangle the threads of the case while trying to keep the words straight in his head. Motherless Brooklyn is a brilliantly original homage to the classic detective novel by one of the most acclaimed writers of his generation.
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Haruki Murakami - The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle (1997)

Japan's most highly regarded novelist now vaults into the first ranks of international fiction writers with this heroically imaginative novel, which is at once a detective story, an account of a disintegrating marriage, and an excavation of the buried secrets of World War II.

In a Tokyo suburb a young man named Toru Okada searches for his wife's missing cat. Soon he finds himself looking for his wife as well in a netherworld that lies beneath the placid surface of Tokyo. As these searches intersect, Okada encounters a bizarre group of allies and antagonists: a psychic prostitute; a malevolent yet mediagenic politician; a cheerfully morbid sixteen-year-old-girl; and an aging war veteran who has been permanently changed by the hideous things he witnessed during Japan's forgotten campaign in Manchuria.

Gripping, prophetic, suffused with comedy and menace, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle is a tour de force equal in scope to the masterpieces of Mishima and Pynchon.

3 books in one volume: The Thieving Magpie, Bird as Prophet, The Birdcatcher.
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As the twentieth century breathes its very last, with Britpop at its zenith, twenty-seven-year-old A&R man Steven Stelfox is slashing and burning his way through London's music industry. Blithely crisscrossing the globe in search of the next megahit—fueled by greed and inhuman quantities of cocaine—Stelfox freely indulges in an unending orgy of self-gratification. But the industry is changing fast and the hits are drying up, and the only way he's going to salvage his sagging career is by taking the idea of "cutthroat” to murderous new levels.
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  • 4 sty 13 19:12
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  • 22 gru 12 17:33
The fifth book in the author's renowned mystery series follows antiques dealer Rei Shimura as she escorts a set of priceless nineteenth-century kimonos on a crazy journey that will find her reviving an old affair and solving a murder.
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  • 22 gru 12 17:12
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  • 22 gru 12 17:12
Who killed Jack Nathanson, the Academy Award-winning director? Plenty of people had motives, including his old Chicago friend whom Jack screwed out of a production deal, and Meg Davis, a seriously disturbed former child star, who may have been sexually abused by Jack during filmings. Not to mention every one of his four ex-wives. But when Maxi Poole, Jack's third wife and Hollywood reporter of Channel 6 News, joins up with the police, they soon realize the murder is not a crime of passion. Now, with Maxi herself a moving target, Jack's housekeeper and latest wife soon become victims of a very angry person. And Jack's secret mistress, who had a longer shelf life than any of his wives, but less to show for the trouble, is about to take the spotlight.
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" Ten years after the catastrophe, a great fallen city has risen again. Ten years after, a horror begins anew . . . or never truly ended. "

The nightmare of 9/11 is a distant but still painful memory for Allison Taylor MacKenna--now married to Mack and living in a quiet Westchester suburb. She has moved on with her life ten years after barely escaping death at the hands of New York's Nightwatcher serial killer. The monster is dead, having recently committed suicide in his prison cell, but something is terribly wrong. Mack has started sleepwalking, with no recollection of where his nighttime excursions are taking him. And here, north of the city, more women are being savagely murdered, their bodies bearing the Nightwatcher's unmistakable signature.

Suddenly Allison must confront a devastating truth: her life is in jeopardy once again . . . and quite possibly from the man she trusts and loves.
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  • 21 gru 12 10:48
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Ty Buchanan is a rising star in his L.A. law firm, until the suspicious death of his fiancee forces him into the underbelly of the city to discover the truth behind her death. He soon has more than his career on the line, as he finds himself tangled up with a mysterious group of former gang members, and becomes the target of a killer.
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  • 21 gru 12 10:44
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In a tale of friendship and survival in the dog-eat-dog world of show business, four aging women whose careers in Hollywood are dwindling are brought closer together when one of them is brutally attacked.
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  • 21 gru 12 10:15
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Wisecracking reporter Dixie Flynn thinks fast and talks even faster—it’s the only way to survive the San Francisco crime beat. When she’s assigned to look into the death of her former lover, artist Diego Chino, Dixie’s instincts tell her there’s more behind the apparent suicide than the police are letting on.

Dixie’s canvassing of the Bay Area art district reveals it to be a perfect picture of corruption, with a handsome art dealer and a reclusive patron in the foreground. After a romantic evening in Chinatown ends in a brush with death, Dixie is more determined than ever to expose the truth. But when a fire in her vicinity turns out to be more than just performance art, it’s clear the perpetrators would rather see Dixie dead than let her destroy their criminal masterpiece.
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Rex Stout - Her Forbidden Knight (1913)

Published for the first time in book form, Stout's early detective story prefigures his immortal Nero Wolfe mysteries. In Stout's early and always entertaining mystery story, when Lila Williams, an innocent telegrapher at New York's upscale Lamartine Hotel, becomes enmeshed in a counterfeiting gang, the unlikely knight who comes to her rescue is on of the forgers.
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  • 20 gru 12 18:22
Would you reveal a secret that might solve a murder but would ruin your life? Ginnie Holmes has found something she never intended to find - an overwhelming passion for a man she should not be with. And they have found somewhere to meet - an abandoned boathouse hidden on the riverbank of the Thames. Then, in a single terrifying event, the lovers' secret becomes a deadly catastrophe. A woman is found murdered at the river's edge, just near the river house. And Ginnie finds herself in the path of extraordinary danger, not only facing the exposure and grief that she has feared, but endangering herself and everyone she loves.
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